24 Jul

Achilles Tendonitis and Achilles Tendonosis

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Achilles Tendonitis and Achilles Tendonosis

The Achilles tendon connects the calf muscle to the heel bone and is the thickest and strongest tendon in the body in humans. While helping raise the foot off the ground with each step, the Achilles tendon can receive a load stress 3.9 times body weight during walking and 7.7 times body weight when running. Despite its ample strength, the Achilles tendon is prone to injury. The most common Achilles injuries are Achilles tendonitis and tendonosis, the former being inflammation of theachil Achilles tendon and the latter being degeneration of Achilles tendonitis. The inflammation from Achilles Tendonitis is usually short-lived. Over time, if tendonitis is not treated, it can degenerate into a worse condition called tendonosis, marked by tears in the tendon. In rare cases, chronic degeneration with or without pain may result in rupture of the tendon.

Repeat after me: I will not run through my Achilles injury. The Achilles will not heal if you keep running on it. When you hurt your Achilles, it is time to start cross training and being gentle with it. The most common risks to the Achilles are sudden increases of repetitive activity without giving it enough time to repair itself. Intense activity causes micro-injuries in the tendon fibers, which require time to heal. Additionally, athletes and runners with inconsistent workout schedules, such as weekend warriors and those who increase their workout intensity and volume too quickly, are prone to Achilles injuries. Achilles injuries may also be due to physiological reasons such as excessive pronation and flat feet, which put extra pressure on the tendon while walking or running.

Achilles tendonitis and tendonosis will result in pain, aching and tenderness along the tendon’s path, increasing when the sides of the tendon are squeezed, but with less pain in the back of the tendon. To diagnose Achilles injuries, your podiatrist will examine the foot, its range of motion, and conduct further assessment with imagining techniques such as X-rays. Initial treatment will include rest. Using heal lift inserts on both feet, or wearing high-heeled shoes with an open back, can help relax the tendon and give it the rest it needs.

Treatment plans will focus on reducing force on the Achilles tendon by means of a cast or walking boot, reducing swelling with ice and oral medications, long term preventative strategies such as custom-made orthotics and night splints, and gradually building a physical therapy regimen that includes stretching and strengthening exercises, soft-tissue massage and mobilization, and ultra-sound therapy. Eccentric stretching and strengthening of the Achilles – that is, elongating the Achilles while doing exercises – are key to long-term rehab. Examples include, first, doing calf stretches in a small lunge with your hands pressing against a wall, second, sitting with one leg straight in front of you while flexing and pointing your toe, or, finally, doing toe raises at the edge of a step or stair. You may even want to consult your podiatrist and physical therapist about working on your gait and stride while running, as gait abnormalities can lead to Achilles tendon and other injuries.

To prevent Achilles tendon injuries, be sure that you strengthen and stretch your calf muscles daily, maintain proper footwear, and use custom-made orthotics if you have flat feet or pronate.


 

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